Year 2 Curriculum Autumn

Mighty Me!

Successful Learners

Areas of learning

As geographers we will:

  • be investigating our locality and the country we live in. We will identify key aspects of the British Isles including landmarks, traditions, flags and emblems.

As historians:

  • we will identify important historical figures that were alive in 1666. We will discuss how we know about the Great Fire of London. We will also consider how London has changed over time and why it looks the way it does today

As Scientists we will:

  • we will notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults.
  • We will find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air).
  • We will describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene.
  • We will also identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses.
  • We will find out how the shapes of solid objects made from certain materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching.

Responsible Citizens

Cooking and Nutrition

  • We will be looking at the wide and diverse diet of foods children enjoy linked to a variety of celebrations.
  • We will evaluate and develop ideas to improve the materials used for our nutritious foods linking with science.

Environment

  • We will identify features of the local and wider environment making links to physical and human geography around the British Isles.
  • We will develop an understanding of how and why London changed after the Great Fire of London.

Spiritual & Moral

  • We will learn about the importance of belonging to different groups and how that makes us feel.
  • We will consider the culture and beliefs of other groups of people within our community.
  • We will celebrate different religious traditions that happen at this time of year.

Communities

  • We will consider how and why incidents from history impact our lives today and make our local communities safer.
  • We will identify important roles in our community, particularly the emergency services.

Year 2 Subject Skills

English

‘Oliver’s Vegetables’, ‘Katie in London’, ‘Room on the Broom’, firework poetry, information books based on The Great Fire of London and instructional texts. Phonological knowledge and handwriting will continue to be developed throughout Year 2.

Reading

Apply phonic knowledge and skills until automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent.

  • Read accurately by blending the sounds in words, recognising alternative sounds for graphemes.
  • Read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain familiar graphemes.
  • Read words containing common suffixes. Read further common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word.
  • Read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered.
  • Read aloud books closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, sounding out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation.
  • Pupils will develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by: listening to, discussing and expressing views about a wide range of contemporary and classic poetry, stories and non-fiction, discussing the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related becoming increasingly familiar with and retelling a wider range of stories being introduced to non-fiction books that are structured in different ways recognising simple recurring literary language in stories and poetry
  • They will understand both the books that they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by: checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading answering and asking questions predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far explain and discuss their understanding of books, poems and other material, both those that they listen to and those that they read for themselves.

Writing

Pupils will develop positive attitudes towards and stamina for writing by:

  • writing narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional)
  • writing about real events
  • writing poetry
  • writing for different purposes They will consider what they are going to write before beginning by planning or saying out loud what they are going to write about writing down ideas and/or keywords, including new vocabulary encapsulating what they want to say, sentence by sentence.
  • They will start to use an adventurous and wide-ranging vocabulary.
  • Sequence events and recount them in appropriate detail.
  • Put their ideas into sentences. Use a clear structure to organise their writing. Vary their writing to suit the purpose and reader.
  • Use the texts they have read as models for their own writing.
  • Develop an understanding of how word choice and order are crucial to meaning. The pupils will begin to make simple additions, revisions and corrections to their own writing by
  • evaluating their writing with the teacher and other pupils
  • re-reading to check that their writing makes sense and that verbs to indicate time are used correctly and consistently, including verbs in the continuous form
  • proof-reading to check for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation [for example, ends of sentences punctuated correctly]
  • They will read aloud what they have written with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear.
  • Grammar Pupils will be taught to use both familiar and new punctuation correctly, including full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks, question marks, commas for lists and apostrophes for contracted forms and the possessive (singular).
  • They will learn how to use: sentences with different forms: statement, question, exclamation, command expanded noun phrases to describe and specify [for example, the blue butterfly]
  • The present and past tenses correctly and consistently including the progressive form subordination (using when, if, that, or because) and co-ordination (using or, and, or but) features of written Standard English use and understand appropriate grammatical terminology when discussing their writing.

Spelling

  • Pupils will continue to be taught to spell by
  • segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes
  • learning new ways of spelling phonemes
  • learning to spell common exception words
  • learning to spell more words with contracted forms
  • learning the possessive apostrophe (singular) [for example, the girl’s book] distinguishing between homophones and near-homophones
  • Pupils will continue to be taught to add suffixes to spell longer words, including –ment, –ness, –ful, –less, –ly
  • Pupils will be taught to apply spelling rules and guidance, as listed in English Appendix 1
  • Pupils will be taught to write from memory simple sentences dictated by the teacher that include words using the GPCs, common exception words and punctuation taught so far.

Handwriting

  • form lower-case letters of the correct size relative to one another
  • start using some of the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters and understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined
  • write capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower case letters
  • use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters.
  • Children will be taught to write with a joined style as soon as they can form letters securely with the correct orientation.

History

The Great Fire of London

Pupils will develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time.

They will learn where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods.

They will learn to ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events.

They will find out some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

Through events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.

They will:

  • place events and objects in chronological order
  • recognise why people did things, why events happened and what happened, as a result,
  • identify differences between ways of life at different times
  • identify and describe what places are like • find out about the past from a range of sources
  • select from their knowledge of history and communicate in a variety of ways
  • identify and describe reasons for, and results of events and changes
  • describe and make links between events, and changes across periods
  • recognise the past is represented and interpreted in different ways, and give reasons for this
  • use a variety of sources to find out about events, people and changes

Maths

Number – number and place value

Pupils will be taught to:

  • recognise the place value of each digit in a two-digit number (10s, 1s)
  • compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100; use <, > and = signs
  • read and write numbers to at least 100 in numerals and in words
  • use place value and number facts to solve problems

Number – addition and subtraction

  • solve problems with addition and subtraction
  • using concrete objects and pictorial representations, including those involving numbers, quantities and measures o applying their increasing knowledge of mental and written methods
  • recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently, and derive and use related facts up to 100
  • add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including
  • a two-digit number and 1s o a two-digit number and 10s o 2 two-digit numbers o adding 3 one-digit numbers
  • show that the addition of 2 numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and subtraction of 1 number from another cannot

Number – multiplication and division

  • recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables, including recognising odd and even numbers
  • calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (×), division (÷) and equals (=) signs
  • show that multiplication of 2 numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of 1 number by another cannot
  • solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts

Number – fractions

  • recognise, find, name and write fractions 1/3 1/4 and 2/4 of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity
  • write simple fractions, for example, 1/2 of 6 = 3 and recognise the equivalence of 2/4 and 1/2

Measurement

  • choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure length/height in any direction (m/cm); mass (kg/g) to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers and scales
  • compare and order lengths, mass and record the results using >, < and =
  • recognise and use symbols for pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value
  • find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money
  • solve simple problems in a practical context involving addition and subtraction of money of the same unit, including giving change
  • compare and sequence intervals of time
  • tell and write the time to quarter past/to the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times
  • know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day

Geometry – Properties of Shapes

  • identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes, including the number of sides
  • identify and describe the properties of 3-D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces
  • identify 2-D shapes on the surface of 3-D shapes, [for example, a circle on a cylinder and a triangle on a pyramid]
  • compare and sort common 2-D and 3-D shapes and everyday objects

Geometry – Position and Direction

  • including movement in a straight line and distinguishing between rotation as a turn and in terms of right angles for quarter, half and three-quarter turns (clockwise and anti-clockwise

Geography

The British Isles

  • Children will develop a fascination about the world and its people
  • Children will be equipped with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments.
  • Children will name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans
  • Children will use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.
  • Children will use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map, and use and construct basic symbols in a key
  • Pupils will develop knowledge about the world, the United Kingdom and their locality. Pupils will be taught to
  • name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas
  • Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the UK
  • use and make world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied
  • use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map
  • use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment

Computing

”We are detectives’- Communicating clues and ‘We are painters’- illustrating an e-book

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated the practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  • are responsible, competent, confident Pupils should be taught to
  • understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions
  • create and debug simple programs
  • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs
  • use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content
  • Recognise common uses of information technology beyond school
  • use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

They will:

  • enter and store information in a variety of forms
  • use text and images to develop their ideas
  • try things out and explore what happens in real and imaginary situations
  • present their completed work effectively talk about what they might change in the future

Art and Design – Design and Technology

Art and design

  • We will be creating a picture that they will select from, and use a wide range of materials and techniques to:
  • re-create the famous Great Fire of London
  • Diaries reminiscent of the era – linked to the history
  • Create displays

Design Technology

  • When designing and making, pupils will be taught to:
  • Select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics
  • Generate ideas and drawings of buildings/houses based on historical facts of the era
  • Make free-standing structures to emulate the houses of the time of the Great Fire of London
  • Evaluate their structure.

Science

Healthy me

  • Pupils notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults
  • find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air)
  • describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene

Materials

  • Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses
  • find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching

They will:

  • use their senses to explore and recognise the similarities and differences between materials sort objects into groups on the basis of simple materials properties
  • recognise and name common types of material and recognise that some of them are found naturally find out about the uses of a variety of materials and how these are chosen for specific uses on the basis of their simple properties
  • find out how the shapes of objects made from some materials can be changed by some processes including squashing, bending, twisting and stretching explore and describe the way some everyday materials change when they are heated or cooled

Scientific Enquiry Pupils will learn

  • That it is important to collect evidence by making observations and measurements when trying to answer a question to ask questions and decide how to find answers to them
  • to think about what might happen before deciding what to do to follow simple instructions to control risks to themselves and others’
  • to compare what happened with what they expected to happen, and try to explain it, drawing on their knowledge and understanding to review their work and explain what they did to others’

PE / Games

Pupils will develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and coordination, individually and with others.

  • They will be able to engage in competitive (both against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations.
  • Pupils will be taught to perform dances using simple movement patterns. In swimming, pupils will be taught to use a range of strokes effectively [for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke]
  • Pupils will develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and coordination, individually and with others.
  • They will be able to engage in competitive (both against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations.

Through gymnastics and invasions games pupils will be taught to:

  • master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities
  • participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending

Languages

  • Broaden vocabulary covered in year 1, extending feelings and numbers.
  • Use knowledge of English or other languages to explore weather phrases.

Music

Pupils will be taught to:

  • Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.
  • Create musical patterns and explore, choose and organise sounds and musical ideas.
  • Christmas concert songs.

PSHE

Health and Wellbeing

  • Pupils will be taught about:
  • Some of the things that keep our bodies healthy; physical activity, sleep, rest and healthy food
  • Making healthy choices
  • Recognising what they are good at and setting simple goals
  • Recognising different kinds of feelings
  • Simple strategies to manage feelings
  • How it feels when there is a change or loss
  • basic personal hygiene routines and why these are important
  • Growing, changing and becoming more independent
  • Household products, including medicines, can be harmful if not used correctly
  • Rules for keeping safe
  • How to ask for help if they are worried about something
  • Privacy in different contexts

 

 

2019 FINAL Autumn Overview

2019 FINAL Autumn POS (2)