Year 4 Curriculum Autumn

Respect

Successful Learners

Areas of learning

As historians we will:

  • we will be learning about the Tudors – kings, queens, how powerful Henry VIII was, and Tudor life.
  • we will be learning about how societal changes in Tudor times shaped modern England; how the lives of ordinary Tudors differed from ours and how Tudors began to explore the New World.

As scientists we will:

  • be learning about the importance of respecting the habitats of organisms and how living things are classified.

As computer technicians we will:

  • we will be learning how to create music on computers

As writers, we will

  • we will study texts about WW1 (The Butterfly Lion), fantasy (The Lost Happy Endings).
  • We will also engage with the traditions of play scripts and pantomime.
  • We will also be learning to plan and edit our writing; creating diaries, newspaper reports and concentrating on good descriptions.

Responsible Citizens

Cooking and Nutrition

  • We will be looking at how our diet and understanding of nutrition has changed since the Tudor period.
  • We learn how poor nutrition can link to illness. In addition, how the Tudors overcame different illnesses.

Environment

  • We will be looking at the impact of environmental change and the effect it has on the organisms that live there.
  • We will consider how towns began to expand during the Tudor era and how domestic and public sanitation has changed since Tudor times.

Spiritual & Moral

  • We will be asking the question: Is it right to develop at the expense
    of nature?
  • We will be discussing why we celebrate Christmas and how different cultures enjoy this time of year.
  • We will also consider what other religious celebrations there are during winter.

Communities

  • We will consider how we can protect and improve our local environments.
  • We will consider the very great differences between the rich and the poor in Tudor times, and ask whether modern times are really, very different.

Year 4 Subject Skills

English

Texts

Mouse, Bird, Snake, Wolf – David Almond

The Butterfly Lion – Michael Morpurgo:

  • A child’s life in pre-WWI Africa and England, and a soldier’s experiences in the trenches.
  • To explore chronology in the narrative; to revise work on time conjunctions; to identify conflicts and resolutions in the story and how these contribute to our understanding of the chronology of the story.

To understand the genre features of play scripts and pantomimes

  • To identify the features of a playscript, and subsequently, of a pantomime, making comparisons with other writing genres.
  • To read and perform scenes from play scripts and pantomimes, looking for clues in the text that guide the actors in presenting it.
  • To plan and write a scene of a playscript, and of a pantomime, building on an existing storyline and knowledge of characters.

Lost Happy Endings – Carol Ann Duffy

  • To extend character description using imagination.
  • To write in the style of an author by creating their own ending to a story.

Non-chronological reports

  • Discuss the different characteristic genre features, e.g., layout, headings, use of photos, type of writing.
  • Use biographical information as the basis for structuring and writing a non-chronological report.

Reading

Develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:

  • listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks
  • Reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes
  • Using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read
  • Identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books
  • Discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination
  • Preparing play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action
  • Understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context
  • Asking questions to improve their understanding of a text
  • Drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with
    evidence
  • Predicting what might happen from details stated and implied
  • Identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising these
  • Identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning
  • Retrieve and record information from non-fiction
  • Participate in a discussion about both books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say.

Writing

Achieve creativity

  • Encourage imaginative and creative writing by using a variety of different examples.

plan their writing by:

  • Discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar
  • Discussing and recording ideas draft and write by:
  • composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures (English Appendix 2)
  • Organising paragraphs around a theme • in narratives, creating settings, characters and plot
  • In non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices [for example, headings and sub-headings] evaluate and edit by:
  • Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements
  • Proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences
  • Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors
  • Read aloud their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements
  • Proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences
  • Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors
  • Read aloud their own writing, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear

SPaG

develop their understanding of the concepts by:

  • Extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, including when, if, because, although
  • Using the present perfect form of verbs in contrast to the past tense
  • Choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid repetition
  • Using conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause
  • Using fronted adverbials
  • Learning the grammar for years 3 and 4 indicate grammatical and other features by:
  • Using commas after fronted adverbials
  • Indicating possession by using the possessive apostrophe with plural nouns
  • Using and punctuating direct speech
  • Focus on year 4 spelling words

Maths

  • Find 1000 more or less than a given number
  • Count backwards through zero to include negative numbers
  • Solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above and with increasingly large positive numbers
  • Read Roman numerals to 100 (I to C) and know that over time, the numeral system changed to include the concept of zero and place value
  • Recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 × 12 – Good Times Challenge!
  • Use place value, known and derived facts to multiply and divide mentally, including multiplying by 0 and 1; dividing by 1; multiplying together three numbers
  • Compare and classify geometric shapes, including quadrilaterals and triangles, based on their properties and sizes
  • Identify acute and obtuse angles and compare and order angles up to two right angles by size
  • identify lines of symmetry in 2-D shapes presented in different orientations
  • complete a simple symmetric figure with respect to a specific line of symmetry
  • Describe positions on a 2-D grid as coordinates in the first quadrant
  • Describe movements between positions as translations of a given unit to the left/right and up/down
  • Plot specified points and draw sides to complete a given polygon
  • interpret and present discrete and continuous data using appropriate graphical methods, including bar charts and time graphs
  • Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using the information presented in bar charts, pictograms, tables and other graphs.

History

The Tudors

Henry VIII and Hampton Court

  • Discover the history of the Tudors and their beginnings. Understand the impact of Henry VIII on Britain. Tudor England: daily life of the rich and poor, including housing,

Clothing, food, education, and entertainment:

  • Characteristic features of the periods and societies studied, including ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children
  • The social, ethnic, cultural, religious diversity of the societies studied
  • Identify and describe reasons for, and results of events and changes
  • Describe and make links between events, and changes across periods.
  • Use a variety of sources to find out about events, people and changes.
  • Ask and answer questions. Select and record relevant information.
  • Recall, select and organise information.
  • Use dates and historical vocabulary to describe the period.
  • Communicate their knowledge and understanding in a variety of ways
  • To look at the local community and to evaluate how the Tudors have had an impact.

Tudor Explorers:

  • To research different explorers from the Tudor period and how they had an impact on Britain and the world.
  • To understand why the Tudors wanted to explore and create new colonies.

Computing

We are Musicians

Working together in a group, children create and refine, through editing, a piece of backing music to accompany work in another medium. This music is then played alongside the work for which it was created as part of a performance or presentation. By the end of this unit, children will have achieved the following learning objectives:

  • To use one or more music or sound editing programs
  • To develop an understanding of the process of creating and developing their composition, refining their ideas through reflection and discussion
  • To develop collaboration skills, as they share in the process of composing, recording and editing music
  • To develop an awareness of how their composition can enhance work in other media.

Art / D & T

Creating Torches

Following on from what has been learnt during the science topic children to create their own torch Using a simple electrical circuit with a switch.

To evaluate the design and effectiveness of products in the shops. To evaluate their design and how to improve it.

Art

  • Record from first-hand evidence, experience and imagination for a variety of purposes.
  • Collect visual and other information to develop ideas, including a sketchbook
  • Investigate and combine visual and tactile qualities and match them to the purpose of their work.
  • Design and make images and artefacts that communicate observations, ideas and feelings by using a variety of methods.

Science

Living Things

  • To explain how living things can be classified.
  • To recognise how a simple key helps identity living things.
  • To ask questions that can be used to construct a key
  • To observe key features of living things.

Habitats

  • To examine invertebrates in their environment
  • To identify invertebrates with a simple key.
  • To recognise that environments change.
  • To understand some of the human impacts on specific habitats.
  • To make careful observations

Classification

  • To understand that living things can be classified using a key.
  • To be able to classify the five vertebrate groups based on physical features.
  • To be able to classify plants as flowering or non-flowering.
  • To ask relevant questions in order to sort and classify.
  • To devise and use a key to identify common trees from their leaves.

Scientific Enquiry

  • That science is about thinking creatively to try to explain how living and non-living things work and to establish links between causes and effects.
  • Make comparisons and identify simple patterns or associations in their own observations and measurements or other data.

Life Processes:

  • To make links between life processes in familiar animals and plants and the environments in which they are found

Living with Electricity

  • To identify common appliances that run on electricity.
  • To classify and record appliances as mains or battery operated.
  • To understand the difference between mains and battery-operated appliances.
  • To understand that electricity can be dangerous.

Circuits

  • To recognise what is needed in order to make a bulb light in a circuit.
  • To recognise and name some of the components that can be used to make a circuit.
  • To explore patterns produced by altering circuits, making comparative tests.
  • To use results to draw simple conclusions.
  • To recognise that some materials conduct electricity.
  • To recognise that some materials do not conduct electricity.
  • To use a simple circuit to create a device.
  • To apply prior learning to a problem or question.

PE / Games

Football –  Dance – Basketball – Gymnastics

Pupils will continue to apply and develop a broader range of skills, learning how to use them in different ways and to link them to make actions and sequences of movement.

  • They will learn to communicate, collaborate and compete with each other.
  • They will develop an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports and learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success.
  • Pupils will be taught the following through dance and basketball:
  • Use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination
  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending
  • Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance perform dances using a range of movement patterns
  • Compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best
  • In swimming, pupils will be taught to swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25 metres while using a range of strokes effectively [for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke]
  • Pupils will continue to apply and develop a broader range of skills, learning how to use them in different ways and to link them to make actions and sequences of movement. They will learn to communicate, collaborate and compete with each other.

They will develop an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports and learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success. Pupils will be taught the following through gymnastics and football:

  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending
  • Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance
  • Compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best

Languages

  • To extend vocabulary learnt in previous years including reading and writing; correctly copying short phrases.
  • Explore the number patterns up to 100 and beyond.

Music

NOTE: Wider Opportunities (learning an instrument) will run throughout year 4 with each class receiving 20 lessons over the year. The music curriculum will thus be reduced.

  1. The Wider Opportunities scheme will enable the pupils to play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts with increasing accuracy and control
  2. Listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  3. Understand the basics of staff and other musical notations
  4. Sing songs etc.

PSHE

Health and Well Being

  • To understand what positively and negatively affects their physical, mental and emotional health.
  • To understand how to make informed choices (including recognising that choices can have positive, neutral and negative consequences) and to begin to understand the concept of a ‘balanced lifestyle’
  • For pupils to reflect on and celebrate their achievements, identify their strengths, areas for improvement, set high aspirations and goals.
  • For pupils to deepen their understanding of good and not so good feelings, to extend their vocabulary to enable them to explain both the range and intensity of their feelings to others.
  • For pupils to recognise that they may experience conflicting emotions and when they might need to listen to or overcome these.
  • How pressure to behave in unacceptable, unhealthy or risky ways can come from a variety of sources, including people they know and the media.
  • To recognise when they need help and to develop the skills to ask for help; to use basic techniques for resisting pressure to do something dangerous, unhealthy, that makes them uncomfortable or anxious or that they think is wrong.

Geography

  • History focuses this term.

 

Autumn Overview 2019 (1)

Autumn POS 2019